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The Fishhawk (2)
Level Two Answer Key: S/V/C Patterns

Sentence #1

Identify all the prepositional phrases. [Review this.]
      He watches the fish as they swim {in the water} {beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
Identify a finite verb or verb phrase:
      He watches the fish as they swim {in the water} {beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
Next find the subject of "watches" by asking "Who or what watches?" The answer is "He."
      He watches the fish as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
Next find the complement of the verb by asking "He watches whom or what?" The answer to that question is "fish.". To determine the type of the complement, ask:
1. Is it a predicate adjective? "Fish" does not describe the subject ("He"), so it cannot be a predicate adjective.
2. Is it a predicate noun? "Fish" is not equal to the subject ("he"), so it cannot be a predicate noun.
3. Is it an  indirect object? The sentence does not mean that he watches "to" or "for" the fish, so it is not an indirect object.
4. Thus "fish" has to be a direct object, the only option left.
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
Check to see if there are any more finite verbs. "Swim" is a finite verb.
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
Next find the subject of "swim" by asking "Who or what swim?" The answer is "they." 
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim{in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
The question 'They swim what?" does not make any sense, so there is no complement. We need to check for another finite verb, which we find in "darts":
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
To find the subject of "darts," we ask "Who or what darts?" The answer is "he." 
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
The question 'He darts what?" does not make any sense, so there is no complement. We need to check for another finite verb, which we find in "catches":
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one {of them}
To find the subject of "catches," we ask "Who or what catches?" The answer is again  "he," so "he darts . . . and catches . . ." form one S/V/C pattern with a compound verb. 
     Next find the complement of "catches" by asking "He catches whom or what?" The answer to that question is "one.". To determine the type of the complement, ask:
1. Is it a predicate adjective? "One" does not describe the subject ("He"), so it cannot be a predicate adjective.
2. Is it a predicate noun? "One" is not equal to the subject ("he"), so it cannot be a predicate noun.
3. Is it an  indirect object? The sentence does not mean that he catches "to" or "for" one, so it is not an indirect object.
4. Thus "one" has to be a direct object, the only option left.
      He watches the fish (DO) as they swim {in the water}{beneath him}; then he darts down suddenly and catches one (DO) {of them}.
Since there are no other finite verbs in this sentence, we are finished with it.

Sentence #2

Identify all the prepositional phrases. [Review this.]
      When he catches a fish {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
Identify a finite verb or verb phrase:
      When he catches a fish {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
To find the subject of "catches," we ask "Who or what catches?" The answer is "he." 
      When he catches a fish {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
     Next find the complement of "catches" by asking "He catches whom or what?" The answer to that question is "fish.". To determine the type of the complement, ask:
1. Is it a predicate adjective? "Fish" does not describe the subject ("He"), so it cannot be a predicate adjective.
2. Is it a predicate noun? "Fish" is not equal to the subject ("he"), so it cannot be a predicate noun.
3. Is it an  indirect object? The sentence does not mean that he catches "to" or "for" a fish, so it is not an indirect object.
4. Thus "one" has to be a direct object, the only option left.
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
Check to see if there are any more finite verbs. "Carries" is a finite verb.
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
To find the subject of "carries," we ask "Who or what carries?" The answer is "he." 
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
     Next find the complement of "carries" by asking "He carries whom or what?" The answer to that question is "he.". To determine the type of the complement, ask:
1. Is it a predicate adjective? "It" does not describe the subject ("He"), so it cannot be a predicate adjective.
2. Is it a predicate noun? "It" is not equal to the subject ("he"), so it cannot be a predicate noun.
3. Is it an  indirect object? The sentence does not mean that he catches "to" or "for" it, so it is not an indirect object.
4. Thus "one" has to be a direct object, the only option left.
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it (DO) off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
We need to check for another finite verb, which we find in "flies." [Note that "eat" is a verb, but it is not finite (a verb at the center of a clause), because finite verb phrases cannot begin with "to."]
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it (DO) off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
To find the subject of "flies," we ask "Who or what flies?" The answer is "he." 
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it (DO) off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
Check for the complement of "flies," by asking "He flies whom or what?" In this sentence that question does not make sense, so there is no complement. (We have an S/V/C pattern, however, because a zero complement counts.)
     We need to check for another finite verb, which we find in "meets." 
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it (DO) off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
To find the subject of "meets," we ask "Who or what meets?" The answer is "eagle." 
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it (DO) off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him.
      Next find the complement of "meets" by asking "He meets whom or what?" The answer to that question is "him." To determine the type of the complement, ask:
1. Is it a predicate adjective? "Him" does not describe the subject ("eagle"), so it cannot be a predicate adjective.
2. Is it a predicate noun? "Him" is not equal to the subject ("eagle"), so it cannot be a predicate noun.
3. Is it an  indirect object? The sentence does not mean that an eagle meets "to" or "for" him, so it is not an indirect object.
4. Thus "him" has to be a direct object, the only option left.
      When he catches a fish (DO) {in his sharp, rough claws}, he carries it (DO) off to eat, and, as he flies away {with it} {for his dinner}, an eagle sometimes meets him (DO).
Since there are no other finite verbs in this sentence, we are finished with it.

Sentence #3

Identify all the prepositional phrases. [Review this.]
     The eagle flies {at him} fiercely {with his sharp bill and claws}, and compels the hawk to drop the fish. 
Identify a finite verb or verb phrase:
     The eagle flies {at him} fiercely {with his sharp bill and claws}, and compels the hawk to drop the fish. 
To find the subject of "flies," we ask "Who or what flies?" The answer is "eagle." 
     The eagle flies {at him} fiercely {with his sharp bill and claws}, and compels the hawk to drop the fish. 
Check for the complement of "flies," by asking "He flies whom or what?" In this sentence that question does not make sense, so there is no complement. 
     We need to check for another finite verb, which we find in "compels." 
     The eagle flies {at him} fiercely {with his sharp bill and claws}, and compels the hawk to drop the fish. 
To find the subject of "compels," we ask "Who or what compels?" The answer is "eagle," so we again have a S/V/C pattern with compound verbs.
      Next find the complement of "compels" by asking "The eagle compels whom or what?" The answer to that question is "hawk." To determine the type of the complement, ask:
1. Is it a predicate adjective? "Hawk" does not describe the subject ("eagle"), so it cannot be a predicate adjective.
2. Is it a predicate noun? "Hawk" is not equal to the subject ("eagle"), so it cannot be a predicate noun.
3. Is it an  indirect object? The sentence does not mean that an eagle compels "to" or "for" the hawk, so it is not an indirect object.
4. Thus "Hawk" has to be a direct object, the only option left.
     The eagle flies {at him} fiercely {with his sharp bill and claws}, and compels the hawk (DO) to drop the fish. 
Since a finite verb or verb phrase cannot begin with "to," "to drop" is not finite. Since there are no other finite verbs in this sentence, we are finished with it.
Go to the Answer Key for Clauses